• An immediate ceasefire will enter into force in the city of Hodeidah, the ports of Hodeidah, Salif and Ras Issa and the governorate after the signing of this agreement. The Stockholm Agreement was the first agreement between the parties to the conflict in Yemen. This is the first time since Kuwait in 2016 that the parties to the conflict have been able to meet, and the first time since the beginning of the conflict that they have managed to agree on several important issues to alleviate the humanitarian situation, Yemen.In in this regard, the Stockholm consultations remain a step forward on the road to confidence-building between the parties, an essential asset for successful peacebuilding. Thanks to the presence of UN Secretary-General Guterres at the closing ceremony, the Stockholm Agreement was announced with great enthusiasm as a great step towards the end of the war. The agreement has three components: the first concerns the exchange of up to 16,000 prisoners between the two parties; the second, a ceasefire and demilitarization of the city of Hodeidah and the port, as well as the two ports of Salif and Ras Issa; And the third is the creation of a committee that must work to de-escalate the fighting in Taiz. The whole document is only 3 pages long and it would be very difficult to produce something vague. The lack of detail and precision reflects the unwillingness of both sides to compromise or find a solution in the interests of the Yemeni people. A little over a year ago, the international community welcomed the revival of the UN-led peace process in Yemen with the conclusion of the Stockholm Agreement between the Yemeni government and the Houthi insurgency (Ansar Allah), relayed by UN Special Envoy Martin Griffiths. Although the agreement was the first political breakthrough in the peace process since the failure of the Geneva and Kuwait talks under Griffith`s predecessors, the obstacles to its implementation were only short-lived. In assessing the progress made on the three key elements of the agreement – the exchange of prisoners, Hodeidah and Taiz – it quickly becomes clear that the truth that the implementation of peace agreements is far more important and more difficult than the conclusion of peace agreements is still true. What needs to be done? The United Nations should, with the help of the P5, clarify the minimum threshold necessary for the implementation of the Hodeida agreement in order to allow a shift towards broader peace talks.

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