Most Japanese immigrants wanted to live in America permanently and came in family groups, in contrast to chinese immigration of young men, most of whom soon returned to China. They have assimilated to American social norms, as on clothing. Many have joined methodical and Presbyterian churches. [3] [4] Restrictions on Japanese immigration were deemed necessary after an influx of Japanese workers into British Columbia and a wave of anti-Asians in the province. More than 8,000 Japanese immigrants arrived in Canada in the first ten months of 1907, a dramatic increase over previous years. [1] Reports that the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway planned to import thousands more Japanese workers to work on the western part of the railway fuelled the anti-Asian atmosphere. [2] Hostility towards the Asian population turned violent at an Asian Exclusion League rally in Vancouver in 1907. The crowd turned into an uncontrollable mob that targeted the city`s Chinese and Japanese residents and destroyed their personal belongings. Charles E. New: Troubled Encounter: The United States and Japan.

Malabar, Fla.: R. E. Krieger, 1979. Diplomatic study of Japan-USA Relations from the beginning of the Meiji Restoration (1868) until the end of the 20th century. Details of how the gentlemen`s agreement of 1907 was the precursor to draconian immigration measures of 1924, which exacerbated relations between the two countries. Chinese immigration to California exploded during the 1852 gold rush, but the Japanese government practiced a policy of isolation that thwarted Japanese emigration. It was not until 1868 that the Japanese government reduced restrictions and Japanese immigration to the United States began. Anti-Chinese sentiments motivated American entrepreneurs to recruit Japanese workers. [2] In 1885, the first Japanese workers arrived in the then independent kingdom of Hawaii.

Tensions in San Francisco had increased, and since Japan`s decisive victory, Japan sanitized against Russia in 1905, demanding equal treatment from Japan. The result was a series of six notes communicated between Japan and the United States from late 1907 to early 1908. The immediate cause of the agreement was anti-Japanese nativism in California. In 1906, the San Francisco Board of Education passed a decree requiring children of Japanese descent to attend separate and separate schools. At that time, Japanese immigrants made up about 1% of California`s population, many of whom had immigrated in 1894 under a treaty guaranteeing free immigration from Japan. [3] [6] Although the agreement limited the number of adult men eligible to enter Canada, it did not provide for any restrictions on the wives of Japanese immigrants. After the introduction of the quota, a large number of Japanese women began to migrate to Canada as „image brides.“ Japanese men in Canada would choose brides based on photos sent by relatives to Japan. After registering her marriage in Japan, the bride was granted a passport to Canada. The arrival of more Japanese women facilitated a natural increase in Canada`s Japanese population. [7] Let me begin by congratulating you on the painstaking thoroness and admirable temperament with which you have gone in the case of the treatment of the Japanese on the coast . .

. . . I had a conversation with the Japanese ambassador before leaving for Panama; read to him what I had to say in my annual message, which he obviously liked very much; and told him that, in my view, the only way to avoid permanent friction between the United States and Japan was to limit as much as possible the movement of citizens from each country to each other to students, travellers, businessmen and others; As no American worker tried to enter Japan, the need was to prevent all immigration of Japanese workers – that is, from the Coolie class – to the United States; that I really hoped that his government would prevent his coolies, all their workers, from coming to either the United States or Hawaii.